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Spectrum: Autism Research News

Tag: schizophrenia

April 2015

Monkey mother’s immune response changes her infant’s brain

by  /  27 April 2015

Monkeys whose mothers are infected with a mock virus while pregnant show abnormal branching of certain brain cells. The findings may help explain why infection during a woman’s pregnancy ups the risk of autism in her children.

1 Comment
February 2015

Rising Star: Sergiu Pasca, scientist at play

by  /  19 February 2015

Sergiu Pasca was among the first to model autism with neurons from affected individuals, a feat that could reveal the biochemical roots of some forms of autism.

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January 2015

Questions for Eric London: Alternative diagnoses for autism

by  /  2 January 2015

Names such as autism, schizophrenia and intellectual disability are ‘umbrella’ terms that muddy the search for the true cause of an individual’s symptoms, says Eric London. He plans to come up with an alternative diagnostic scheme for developmental disabilities over the next two years.

8 Comments
December 2014

Notable papers of 2014

by  /  22 December 2014

It’s no easy feat to whittle down the list of the most influential autism papers to a mere 10. So please consider this but a taste of the burgeoning field, presented in chronological order and based on suggestions from many researchers.

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Method isolates protein complexes from neuronal junctions

by  /  17 December 2014

Researchers have for the first time isolated and characterized protein complexes found at the points of connection between neurons. Mutations in some of these proteins are linked to autism.

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November 2014

Mother’s immunity linked to brain inflammation in monkeys

by  /  15 November 2014

Monkeys exposed in utero to their mother’s immune response to a mock infection show inflammation in their brains four years later. Researchers presented the unpublished work today at the 2014 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

3 Comments
September 2014

New tools validate dish-grown neurons for autism research

by  /  1 September 2014

Creating neurons from stem cells in a lab dish is a popular approach for studying developmental disorders such as autism. But how closely these neurons resemble those found in an adult brain has been unclear. Two new methods, described 2 July in Neuron, suggest that these neurons recapitulate the early stages of development.

2 Comments
August 2014

Uta and Chris Frith: A partnership of the mind

by  /  28 August 2014

British psychologist Uta Frith has singlehandedly transformed our understanding of autism. In partnership with her husband, neuroimaging expert Chris Frith, she helped launch the field of cognitive neuroscience and shaped a generation of scientists.

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Large genetic deletion leads to autism, but not always

by  /  21 August 2014

To characterize people who carry deletions in 16p11.2 and 15q13.3, genetic regions linked to autism, two studies published this summer looked in detail at dozens of people with either deletion. The studies found that deletions in these regions lead to diverse symptoms that only sometimes include autism. 

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Should autism research focus on common or rare risk factors?

by  /  20 August 2014

New estimates on the role of common mutations in autism raise questions about how to quantify and parse genetic risk. Three experts say both common and rare variants are worth pursuing.
 

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