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Spectrum: Autism Research News

Tag: SHANK3

June 2017

Family groups play key role in advancing autism research

by  /  27 June 2017

Families need more support from researchers in order for their heroic efforts to be optimally effective.

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Why it’s time to spin autism genes into drug screens

by  /  27 June 2017

Autism researchers’ top priority should be shifting their focus to finding treatments for severe forms of the condition.

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April 2017

Webinar: Michael Platt discusses monkey models for autism

24 May 2017

Watch the complete replay of Michael Platt’s webinar discussing monkey models for autism.

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February 2017

Rats with mutant SHANK genes show autism-like behaviors

by  /  16 February 2017

Researchers have engineered two new rats with mutations in a family of genes that function at neuronal junctions, they reported today at the 2014 International Meeting for Autism Research in Atlanta.

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January 2017

Autism gene may double as pain processor

by  /  25 January 2017

SHANK3, a leading candidate gene for autism, helps sensory neurons in mice respond to pain.

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December 2016

Spectrum of color: Our favorite photos from 2016

26 December 2016

Peruse our picks for the best science photos published on Spectrum this year.

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Heavy pill on scale

Hot topics of 2016

26 December 2016

These five trending topics hint at important discoveries to come.

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September 2016

Mice with faulty SHANK3 mimic autism features in people

by  /  26 September 2016

Mice with a genetic glitch in just one copy of SHANK3, a leading candidate gene for autism, show brain and behavioral features of the condition.

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July 2016

Autism gene wires social reward circuits in mouse brains

by  /  14 July 2016

Mice with mutations in SHANK3, a leading autism candidate, may lack the neural wiring that would compel them to seek social contact.

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June 2016

Working with mice? Question their background

by  /  30 June 2016

A standard mouse strain used by researchers worldwide harbors an unintended mutation that impairs immune cell development — and may confound results.

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